Popup Tires

amcc

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jun 4, 2007
Does anyone have a recommendation on where to get tires for the popup? I don’t know any other campers in my real life so I turn to the knowledgeable online friendly posters here for advice. I know when we got it 4 years ago, I ordered tires from somewhere but my email doesn’t archive that far. Thanks and happy camping!
 

bama_ed

It's kind of fun to do the impossible-Walt Disney
Joined
Sep 23, 2004
Well, amcc. I got some a few weeks before my "Camping With the Manatees" trip. I purchsed them from my local Goodyear tire and car center guy who has taken care of me and my family fleet for 20 years (wait till all the kids start driving their own vehicles-at the extreme I had 5 vehicles and a trailer for tires/oil/brakes/what-not/fender benders/insurance-I was crazy till I moved them forcibly off the "family payroll"). So he bought 'em, balanced 'em, mounted 'em, and I got an out-the-door price. Mine were ST185/80R13 radials from Carlisle. Three of them (two on the axle and a spare) total was $265 out-the-door.

Not many choices for 13 inch diameter trailer tires (or said another way, 14 inch tires and up have more choices). You still have to buy/balance/mount whatever you choose to put on. What size do you have on there now? Remember your choice/load range should align with your axle rating.

Good luck!

Bama Ed

PS - my original tires (bought the Aliner new) lasted 5 years and I didn't want to push my luck further than that. It is stored in a garage which helps with the UV part of aging on the tires (which might be more of an issue where you live-how to you store your pup?). But it was time.

PPS - now down to three vehicles and a trailer. In less than two years, will be two vehicles and a trailer. Gotta be strong advocate for change.....
 
Last edited:


amcc

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jun 4, 2007
Thanks Ed! When we got it 4 years ago, I just looked at the tires on there and bought the same ones. I was learning everything on google, YouTube, and popup forums so that’s how I knew what to look for.
My popup is stored outside and after the last trip, we noticed that one tire was bald on both edges. Google told me that was a result of underinflating.
I know I sound like an idiot but RVs and camping are not a big thing here so there’s no peers to ask.
All that said, much of what you wrote is ??? for me. I’m off to google but I don’t know what axle rating is nor load range. For the amount of camping we do (we will have 18 nights this year by early May), we are still so ignorant.

My son just got his license. He’s not driving on his own yet but our insurance made us add him - $250! more a month.
 
  • 2goofycampers

    Sounds like something a camping trip could cure!
    Moderator
    Joined
    Feb 10, 2008
    We always go to Discount Tire. There are a bunch of them. We had a problem in Fl had our receipt from Tn and they replaced it. They will rotate and fix flats for free also.
     

    bama_ed

    It's kind of fun to do the impossible-Walt Disney
    Joined
    Sep 23, 2004
    Load range is how much weight a tire can carry. That's determined by how many plies (layers of material) are built into the running tread that touches the pavement. More plies = more weight. Tire makers make tires the same size that can handle differing amount of weight to accomodate different trailer types and axle manufacturers.

    The axle of most popups are rated either for 3,000 lbs or 3,500 lbs (if you are single axle which is what limits the weight and cargo capacity of a popup). The weight of the trailer, all the stuff inside, all rides on the axle and two tires. It's all about safety.

    Here is a table of info for the tires I have. This is not an endorsement just info: look at the difference in the load range (C or D) and the Max Load Capacity (weight each tire can carry):

    https://www.carlislebrandtires.com/our-products/product-detail/radial-trail-hd

    For my ST185/80R13, note two Load Range C tires equals approximately 3,000# and two Load Range D tires are approximately 3,500#. So buy the tires your axle can handle but don't (on a combined basis) exceed your axle's weight rating.

    So I don't know if you have any paperwork on your popup that gives specs on components or can do any google research on it. Or get a visual on the ground inspection and maybe find a name or serial number. Most popup manufacturers used a only a handful of suppliers.

    If you buy the Load Range D but your axle can only handle Load Range C, that's a little extra money wasted and a false sense of security that you can carry an extra 500#. If you get the LRC but can handle the LRD, you're cutting about 500# off because now the tires become the limiting factor on how much weight you can carry (but hey, you saved a few coin).

    So my question was do you know your axle rating and what tires are on there now? (size/brand).

    Bama Ed

    PS - my point was to figure out what the popup can have but you can default to LRC for the rim size you have then it's just brand/seller selection. Sorry if I made it too complicated. Goodyear doesn't even make a trailer tire my size anymore (they did when I had bought a replacement set on my old Jayco about 8 years ago).
     
    Last edited:

    rideswithchrist

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 7, 2014
    Our rims were rusted and ugly, so we ordered a set that came pre-assembled/mounted and balanced from Amazon. Also 185/80r13.
    We skipped Discount tire because ours didn't sell trailer sizes so I assumed they might try to put passenger tires on it like it came from the PO with o_O
    If you have a trailer shop, they can help too. OR try Popup Portal and see if someone has the same one as you. Our trailer has the weight on the side.
     

    ShelliRenee

    Disney Princess trapped in a fat girl's body!
    Joined
    Apr 21, 2009
    I got mine at a Tractor Supply Company. Was able to put them on myself with just our stabilizing jacks, since the tires came complete with rim and all. I was told at the time it is good to just go on ahead and get a new set every year since it was fairly cheap, that the tires now a days don't last on the blacktops long.
     
  • Sjm9911

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 11, 2019
    Tires will last about 5 years, they get damaged from the sun. The tread will be good but they can blow out after that time. There is a date code stamped on them.

    Load range is key! If you by used try and check what the camper is rated for, who knows what the PO did.

    The stabiziers on a pop up are ment as that, stabilizers. There not ment to lift the pup. So , get a jack. And take some wood with you( or like the stacking blocks) not everywhere will be level when you get a flat.

    And, there is the radial, v bias tire. Radials are better for speed, and less heat, so good for the highway. If you go closer ( not a lot of highway travel) and do a lot of boondocking the bias are better.

    As always, check the pressure, and not a bad idea to grease up the bearings while your changing the tires. You can also inspect the breaks, and test your breakaway switch if equipped.

    Have fun, happy camping!
     

    Sjm9911

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 11, 2019
    Forgot to add , there is a speed rating on the tire also, try not to go over that. Its usually from about 65 mph. Ive seen some as high as 78 mph. So that can be a consiferstion slso.
     

    bama_ed

    It's kind of fun to do the impossible-Walt Disney
    Joined
    Sep 23, 2004
    I was told at the time it is good to just go on ahead and get a new set every year since it was fairly cheap, that the tires now a days don't last on the blacktops long.
    wut?

    Yes, what sjm9911 said was right. A decent tire, radial or bias, 6 or 8 ply, will last around five years. I've had one blowout on my original popup and it was *checks notes* right at 5 years with the original tires. Annual replacements are not necessary.

    Bama Ed
     

    Teamubr

    Formerly racing around the country.
    Joined
    Nov 7, 2010
    I was told at the time it is good to just go on ahead and get a new set every year since it was fairly cheap, that the tires now a days don't last on the blacktops long.
    This was from the guy who sells tires?

    I once had an HVAC guy tell me I "needed" to have my furnace and A/C "serviced" with each season change... that's right. 4 times a year.

    I don't use him anymore.

    I start looking to replace my tires in the 4th year or when I have one blow, which ever comes first. I replaced all my 5er tires last year in the 3rd season after I had one blowout on the way home from GSP. It took out my brake wiring and gas lines. These were the factory tires though. Load range E on a 15,000 lb trailer, very near their limit. The new load range G should last much longer.

    j
     
    Last edited:
  • ShelliRenee

    Disney Princess trapped in a fat girl's body!
    Joined
    Apr 21, 2009
    This was from the guy who sells tires?

    I once had an HVAC guy tell me I "needed" to have my furnace and A/C "serviced" with each season change... that's right. 4 times a year.

    I don't use him anymore.

    I start looking to replace my tires in the 4th year or when I have one blow, which ever comes first. I replaced all my 5er tires last year in the 3rd season after I had one blowout on the way home from GSP. It took out my brake wiring and gas lines. These were the factory tires though. Load range E on a 15,000 lb trailer, very near their limit. The new load range G should last much longer.

    j
    No it was not the person who sold me tires, it was the State Trooper who stopped to help me change one of the tires after having a blow out on I-75. He pointed out that the most of the time a pop-up trailer is sitting on a black top in a parking lot (which mine does) and that makes the tires disintegrate faster.. And I do have jack.
     

    Teamubr

    Formerly racing around the country.
    Joined
    Nov 7, 2010
    it was the State Trooper who stopped to help me change one of the tires after having a blow out on I-75.
    I'm impressed. The only way to get a trooper to stop around here is to blatantly commit a crime. And sometimes not even then. It sounds like he was just trying to be helpful. Uninformed, but helpful. I've never heard that about sitting on asphalt. Running on hot asphalt can increase heat in the tire which can impact its life expectancy, but not just sitting. Like someone above said, keep them out of the sun (covered) and the UV rays when stored and keep them aired up. After I get 3 years on them, I start getting nervous. I replace them when the tread gets worn or I have one fail. Then they all go.

    I figured you were using a jack. I didn't think the stabilizers would hold the weight very well.

    j
     

    Sjm9911

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 11, 2019
    All good i was just going down the list. I store my camper outside, many do, without consequences, on asphalt. As stated, make sure the air is in the tires. The newer radial tires ( they only had the bias in the past) hold up much better to heating up while driving. Just stay under the speed rating on the tire. That and proper grease is your key to not overheating.

    Side note, when i bought my used pop up , i drove it on the highway , at about 75, and with 15 year old tires for about 40 miles, i got lucky i dint kill myself or someone else. Live and learn.
     

    4077

    I'll fly for this Mickey Mouse outfit!
    Joined
    Mar 23, 2013
    Moving trailer tomorrow for first time since October! Off to the dealer for my first new set of tires since I am at year 5! I Don't usually get excited at dropping such money, but it means camping is soon :jumping1:
     



    Connect

    Disney News and Updates





    SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DAILY EMAIL
    Subscribe and never miss out on Disney News, Deals and Updates.






    Top